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How to Search for Your Revolutionary Patriot in Pennsylvania
How to Search for Your Revolutionary Patriot in Pennsylvania
Our Price: $10.00


Dorothee Hughes Carousso (au)
There is a misconception that anyone who is interested in tracing his or her blood line to a Revolutionary patriot is interested only for the purpose of joining a hereditary patriotic society (HPS). One of the advantages of joining a HPS is that the established blood line -- & the services of the patriot -- become a permanent record in the files of the HPS. This guide explains the 2 steps in the search for a Revol. patriot. The 1st step is to prove your direct blood line back to the ancestor. This step is usually the most time-consuming & difficult, & must be employed for membership in a HPS. The 2nd step is to prove your ancestor’s service in the Revolution. This guide also includes a list of contents of the Unindexed “Penna. Archives” Which Relate to the Amer. Revol. (Philadelphia: Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania)
So You Are Being Proposed for Membership in a Hereditary Society; What Is a Document?
So You Are Being Proposed for Membership in a Hereditary Society; What Is a Document?
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Robert LeConte Halberstadt (au); Dorothee Hughes Carousso (au)
Combines two articles published by The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania in their “Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine”. The ever increasing interest in genealogy has brought many queries about joining one or more of the hereditary patriotic societies from people who discover that they might have some qualifying ancestors. Often prospective members are confused, & even some of the societies are confused as to their own administrative procedures for new candidates & what documentation is required to prove the lineage. The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania through its Committee of Hereditary & Patriotic Societies recommends certain standards for admittance procedure & genealogical documentation. (Philadelphia: Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 1980)
Pennsylvania Militia in 1777
Pennsylvania Militia in 1777: A Reprint from “The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine,” Volume XXIII, Number 3
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Hannah Benner Roach (au)
Reprint of an article in “The PA Genealogical Mag.,” on the org. of the PA militia, as established under the act passed 17 March 1777. Complete records pertaining to the militia have not survived. Those which have been published in the various series of the “Pennsylvania Archives” are, in many instances, incorrectly identified & arranged in a confused manner. Too often, as a result, the fact that a man’s name appears in those records has been accepted as prima facie evidence that he was a patriot who served his country faithfully & diligently. The dual purpose of this study is to render intelligible the meaning of those records, & then to relate them to the actual operation of the militia, with particular reference to the first year of its operation under the act. (Philadelphia: Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 1964)
Guide to Records of the Sale of Commonwealth Property in the County of Philadelphia, 1780-1798
Guide to Records of the Sale of Commonwealth Property in the County of Philadelphia, 1780-1798
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James M. Duffin (ed); Mark Frazier Lloyd (fr)
Abstracts the names of those whose wartime purchase of previously unsold Phila. County land helped fund the PA troops in the Amer. Revolutionary army. The individ. who paid their private fortunes into the provisional commonwealth gov’t. were taking financial risk & demonstrating real courage in their patriotism, for the land they were purchasing had been confiscated in 1779 from the Penn family proprietors of PA, who objected & asserted their continuing property rights. If the British had defeated the Amer. revolutionaries, the restored proprietary courts would have ruled the sales null & void & perhaps declared them an act of treason. The land would have reverted to the Penn family & the Amer. purchase money lost. Includes street locations. (Philadelphia: Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 1996)
Philadelphia Maps
Philadelphia Maps, 1682-1982: Townships -- Districts -- Wards
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When the province of PA was formed in 1682, three counties were established: Phila., Bucks, & Chester. Through the years as more people poured into the province & more land was obtained by the Penn family, additional counties were formed: Berks & Montgomery. Today, records will be found in Phila. for Berks County prior to 1752 & for Montgomery County prior to 1784. While the process of county formation continued in PA as late as 1878, changes were made within counties, in township lines, as well. In 1854 the city & county of Phila. were consolidated. This reprinted volume contains a valuable collection of maps which trace the changes in ward boundaries over the years, & also includes a map of the city wards as of 1982.
Guide to 1930 Pennsylvania City
Guide to 1930 Pennsylvania City and County Directory: An Aid for Tracking Pennsylvania Ancestors in the 1930 Census
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The 1930 Census is not indexed for the state of PA. This guide is a source directory for org. that hold city direct. for areas of PA. The info. listed is by county, then by org. that have city direct. or tele. direct. avail. to search. The cities or towns listed for each county are located within that county. City direct. often provide additional info. about individ. such as place of employ. and name of spouse. All of the adults in the household are listed. The entries are arranged alpha. by last name  and also by address and tele. no. City direct. are compiled through door-to-door surveys and are pub. at irregular intervals. Each area, town or city in a city direct. may be listed separately. This guide includes org. that have city direct. for the years 1929, 1930 and/or 1931.
Pennsylvania Civil War Veteran Burials Volume I: Adams County, Perry County
Pennsylvania Civil War Veteran Burials: Volume I: Adams County, Perry County
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Marion F. Egge (ed); James M. Beidler (pf)
The Civil War is a subject of increasing fascination by historians, genealogists, & the public, partly due to the ability of many Amer. to trace their roots to a vet. of the conflict. The Gen’l. Soc. of PA has embarked on a project to preserve & disseminate the records held by county depts. of vets’ affairs. These depts. hold records of the burials of vets for purposes of erection of monuments & placement of flags. For this vol., it is not claimed that the burials recorded by the county consist of every Civil War soldier, merely those on file at the county office. In addition, these are transcriptions of the records from the vets’ depts. & some errors may lie in those original records. Finally, more info. about the vets is filed at the Dept. of Vets Affairs than has been pub. in this vol. (Philadelphia: Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 2000)
Military Petitions for Naturalization Filed in the Philadelphia {County} District Court 1862-1874
Military Petitions for Naturalization Filed in the Philadelphia {County} District Court 1862-1874
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Jefferson M. Moak (ed)
In 1862, the U.S. gov’t., as a reward to the aliens who served in the Union forces during the Civil War, allowed these vets. to petition for citizenship after receiving an honorable discharge. The 5-yr. residency requirement was reduced to 1-yr. There were over 950 vets. who petitioned the Phila. [County] District Court between 1862 & 1874 using their military service to satisfy the requirements for citizenship. The 1862 fed. law restricted the use of military service only to those vets. of the land forces. However, the clerks in Phila. granted citizenship to many vets. of the U.S. Navy & Marine Corps. The fed. gov’t. did not grant non-army veterans the same rights until 1894. This index represents 15% of the total number of petitions filed in Phila. during this period. (Philadelphia: Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 2000)
Back Part of Germantown
Back Part of Germantown: A Reconstruction: Reprinted from “The Pennsylvania Genealogical Magazine”
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Hannah Benner Roach (au); Jefferson M. Moak (ed)
That part of Philadelphia known today as Chestnut Hill, & in the early 18th century as “the hindermost part” or the “back part” of Germantown Township, includes within its boundaries the divisions of Sommerhausen & Crefeld, which formed the northernmost section of the original German township as laid out in 1684. It was 20 years or more after the first settlement in the lower part of the township before permanent improvements were established in Sommerhausen & Crefeld. This local history includes numerous mentions of individuals, families & events in this community during the 18th century. Here is a genealogical sketch of the Michael Schutz family of Chestnut Hill using the entire community as backdrop. Maps. (Philadelphia: Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 2001)
Guide to the Mortgages of the General Loan Office of the Province of Pennsylvania, 1724-1756
Guide to the Mortgages of the General Loan Office of the Province of Pennsylvania, 1724-1756
Our Price: $25.00


James M. Duffin (ed); Mark Frazier Lloyd (fr)
The General Loan Office of PA was created by an act of the Provincial Assembly passed 2 March 1722/23. The Assembly decided to issue paper money to help stimulate the lagging local economy. The success of the Loan was considerable, & the Assembly passed re-emission acts, whose most important feature was that the money returned from prior loans was used to grant new mortgages. The major series of records generated by the General Loan Office which survive are the registers of mortgages. The introduction to this guide discusses the history of the General Loan Office & describes the surviving Loan Office records. The volume’s exhaustive abstract to this primary source makes it accessible to genealogical research. Name Index. (Philadelphia: Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 1995)
   
 
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