Join our mailing list!



Official PayPal Seal

(Your shopping cart is empty)
You are here: Home > Diane Publishing Books
Choose a sub category:
Government Reports NASA
Drama
Sort By:
Page of 4168
Defense Saellite Communications: DOD Needs Additional Information to Improve Procurements

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


The Dept. of Defense (DOD) depends on commercial SATCOM to support a variety of critical mission needs, from unmanned aerial vehicles and intelligence to voice and data for military personnel. In FY 2011, the most recent information available, DOD spent over $1 billion leasing commercial satellite communications (SATCOM). GAO found that some major DOD users of commercial satellite bandwidth were dissatisfied with Defense Info. Systems Agencyńˇ╗s (DISAńˇ╗s) acquisition process seeing it as too costly and lengthy. They also indicated that the contracts used were too inflexible. This report (1) assesses the extent to which DOD efficiently procures bandwidth; (2) analyzes the extent to which DOD has identified its future SATCOM requirements using DOD and commercial satellite services, as well as how those requirements will be met; and (3) identifies the steps DOD is taking to improve its procurements of commercial SATCOM. Table and figure. This is a print on demand report.
Dossier on Steve Jobs

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


Medicare: Part B Premiums

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


Medicare is a federal insurance program that pays for covered health care services of most individuals aged 65 and over and certain disabled persons. In 2012, the program is expected to cover 50 million persons (41 million aged and 9 million disabled) at a total cost of $586 billion. Most individuals (or their spouses) who are 65 and older, and have worked in covered employment and paid Medicare payroll taxes for 40 quarters receive premium-free Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance). Those entitled to Medicare Part A (regardless of whether they are eligible for premium-free Part A), have the option of enrolling in Part B, which covers such things as physician and outpatient services and medical equipment. Contents of this report: Introduction; Medicare Part B Eligibility and Enrollment; Late-Enrollment Premium Penalty and Exceptions; Collection of the Part B Premium; Determining the Part B  Premium; Income-Related Premiums; Premium Assistance for Low-Income Beneficiaries; Protection of Social Security Benefits from Increases in Medicare Part Premiums; Part B Premiums Over Time; Current Issues. Figures and tables. This is a print on demand report.
Health Insurance Exchanges Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


The fundamental purpose of a health insurance exchange is to provide a structured marketplace for the sale and purchase of health insurance. The authority and responsibilities of an exchange may vary, depending on statutory or other requirements for its establishment and structure. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA, P.L. 111-148, as amended) requires health insurance exchanges to be established in every state by Jan. 1, 2014. ACA provides certain requirements for the establishment of exchanges, while leaving other choices to be made by the states. Contents of this report: Introduction; ACA Exchanges; Establishment of ACA Exchanges; What Exchanges Do; Federal Responsibilities for Establishment and Administration of All Exchanges; Coverage Offered through the Exchanges; Interaction with Other ACA Provisions. Tables. This is a print on demand report.
Controlled Substances Act: Regulatory Requirements

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


This report highlights certain non-criminal regulatory requirements of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). The CSA and its implementing regulations establish a framework through which the federal government regulates the use of controlled substances for legitimate medical, scientific, research, and industrial purposes, and prevents these substances from being diverted for illegal purposes. The CSA assigns various plants, drugs, and chemicals (such as narcotics, stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens, and anabolic steroids) to one of five schedules based on the substanceńˇ╗s medical use, potential for abuse, and safety or dependence liability. Schedule I contains substances that have no currently accepted medical use and cannot safely be made available to the public under a prescription, while Schedules II, III, IV, and V include substances that have recognized medical uses and may be manufactured, distributed, and used in accordance with the CSA. The order of the schedules reflects substances that are progressively less dangerous and addictive. To restrict access to chemicals used in the illicit manufacture of certain controlled substances, the CSA also regulates 40 ńˇýlisted chemicals.ńˇŁ Furthermore, the CSA regulates controlled substance ńˇýanalogues,ńˇŁ which are substances that are not controlled but are structurally or pharmacologically similar to substances found in Schedule I or II and have no accepted medical use. This is a print on demand report.
Information on Materials and Practices for Improving Highway Pavement Performance

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


The nation's more than 4 million miles of roads are key to the economy, facilitating the movement of goods and people. Keeping them in good condition requires substantial resources: public entities spent more than $180 billion in 2008 on highways, with about $40 billion coming from the federal government. Despite these outlays, the Fed. Highway Admin. (FHWA) estimates that these funding levels are insufficient to maintain or improve the condition of the nation's highways through 2028. Further, the major source of federal surface transportation funding -- federal motor fuel tax revenues deposited into the Highway Trust Fund -- is eroding. It is estimated that, as of March 2012, to maintain current spending levels and account for inflation from 2013 to 2022, the Highway Trust Fund will require more than $125 billion over what it is expected to take in during that period. State highway agencies, the entities that are ultimately responsible for keeping most major highways in good repair, will need to develop strategies for doing so at reduced costs. One potential strategy is using more cost-effective materials and practices. This report describes (1) selected materials and practices that states can use or are using to improve the performance of pavements, including what is known about their costs and benefits, if any; and (2) challenges, if any, to using these materials and practices. Tables and figures. This is a print on demand report.
Public Transit: Funding for New Starts and Small Starts Projects, October 2004 through June 2012

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


The Federal Transit Admin. (FTA), through the Capital Investment Grant program, which includes the New Starts and Small Starts programs, provides funds to transit project sponsors to build new or expanded fixed-guideway transit systems. Small Starts also includes projects known as Very Small Starts projects. These three categories ńˇţ New, Small, and Very Small projects ńˇţ vary by total project cost and amount of the Capital Investment Grant program contribution to the cost. For New Starts, total estimated project costs exceed $250 million; for Small Starts, they are less than $250 million, and for Very Small Starts they are less than $50 million. For New Starts the federal contribution is at least $75 million, for Small Starts it is less than $75 million. The Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users requires an annual review of FTAńˇ╗s New Starts program. This report discusses the extent to which project sponsors use non-New Starts funding to help construct New Starts, Small Starts and Very Small Starts projects. Tables and figures. This is a print on demand report.
Financial Audit: Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) Fiscal Years 2012 and 2011 Financial Statements

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


This report transmits the Government Accountability Office (GAO) auditorńˇ╗s report on the results of GAOńˇ╗s audits of the FY 2012 and 2011 financial statements of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Comm. (SEC) and its Investor Protection Fund (IPF), which is incorporated in the enclosed U.S. SEC FY 2012 Agency Financial Report. GAO found: (1) the financial statements are presented fairly, in all material respects, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; (2) SEC maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of Sept. 30, 2012, although internal control deficiencies exist that merit attention by those charged with governance; and (3) no reportable noncompliance in FY 2012 with provisions of laws and regulations GAO tested. Figures. This is a print on demand report.
Information Technology Dashboard: Opportunities Exist to Improve Transparency and Oversight of Investment Risk at Select Government Agencies

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


In June 2009, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) launched the federal Information Technology (IT) Dashboard, a public website that reports performance data for over 700 major IT investments that represent about $40 billion of the estimated $80 billion budgeted for IT in FY 2012. The Dashboard is to provide transparency for these investments to aid public monitoring of government operations. It does so by reporting, among other things, how agency CIOs rate investment risk. This report (1) characterizes the CIO ratings for selected federal agenciesńˇ╗ IT investments as reported over time on the Dashboard; (2) determines how agencies' approaches for assigning and updating CIO ratings vary; and (3) describes the benefits and challenges associated with agenciesńˇ╗ approaches to the CIO rating. Tables and figures. This is a print on demand report.
Fighter Aircraft: Better Cost Estimates Needed for Extending the Service Life of Selected F-16s and F/A-18s

Product price is not filled in. This product cannot be purchased.


Fighter aircraft are important to achieve and maintain air dominance during combat operations as well as to protect the homeland. The Department of Defense (DOD) plans to replace many of its current fighter fleet with the F-35; however, the F-35 program has experienced numerous delays and cost increases. To maintain fighter capabilities and capacity, the Air Force and Navy have decided to upgrade and extend the service life of selected F-16 and F/A-18 aircraft. In this context, this report (1) describes the Air Force and Navy plans to upgrade and extend the service life of selected F-16 and F/A-18 aircraft; and (2) assesses the extent to which cost estimates for these upgrades and life extensions exhibit characteristics of a high-quality cost estimate. Figures. This is a print on demand report.
   
 
Diane Publishing Co
PO Box 617
Darby, PA 19023-0617
1-800-782-3833
 About Us
 Become an Affiliate
 Privacy Policy
 Send Us Feedback
 
Company Info | Advertising | Product Index | Category Index | Help | Terms of Use
Copyright � 2004 Diane Publishing Company. All Rights Reserved.
Built with Volusion